Massive delivery problems with the iPhone 13 still until 2022

Apple has been struggling with delivery problems since the launch of the iPhone 13. This situation could drag on into next year.

Even a giant company like Apple is not spared from the global chip shortage. Bottlenecks at chip manufacturers have already led to delivery problems since the iPhone 13 was presented. While iPhone 13 mini and iPhone 13 are relatively well available, it looks less good for the Pro models. Certain iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max variants will not be available for another month. According to an insider report, the situation is not expected to ease before February 2022.

Delivery problems with the iPhone 13 remain

Branchenanalyst “DigiTimes” zufolge fahren die Zulieferer derzeit die Produktion hoch, um der Knappheit an integrierten Schaltkreisen entgegenzuwirken. Von Sourcen, die mit der Versorgungskette in Verbindung stehen, heißt es, dass die Fertigungsunternehmen ebenfalls den Zusammenbau ankurbeln. Damit seien sie auf dem Weg, die Nachfrage nächsten Februar decken zu können.

However, this means that in the important pre-Christmas period, some iPhone 13 models will continue to have limited availability. An iPhone 13 Pro with 256 GB of storage, for example, currently has a delivery time of up to one month.

It’s not just the iPhone 13 that’s affected by supply issues

Apple does have a significant impact on manufacturing companies, some of which are blocking entire production lines just for Apple products. Nevertheless, it still relies on off-the-shelf component supplies, such as battery or display controllers.

This year, the new iPads and MacBooks with M1 chips were already affected by the chip shortage. The new MacBook Pros with M1 Pro and M1 Max are currently experiencing similar delivery problems as the iPhone 13. The better-equipped models are currently only available in four to five weeks. In other countries, such as the USA, the situation is even worse. Some of the delivery backlogs will last until the beginning of 2022.

Source

  • DigiTimes